Podcasts: A Movable Feast (For Your Ears)

Looking for something fun to listen to while you study? While you work out? While you drive to campus? While you clean your dorm room? Give podcasts a try!

Podcasts are available on practically any subject you could ever want to listen to, both fiction and non-fiction. And the best part? Most podcasts can be listened to on demand any time for FREE either directly from websites or using a mobile app such as iTunes, Google Play, SoundCloud, and Stitcher.

I’ve highlighted a few of my personal favorites below. I love receiving recommendations, so shoot me an email at bbell@stfrancis.edu and tell me what you’ve been listening to!

Fiction Podcasts

Welcome to Night Vale
This radio show chronicles the goings-on in a surreal, nightmarish desert town called Night Vale. The radio host delivers reports of hooded figures, ghoulish strangers, and an enormous, monstrous librarian in a hilariously sinister pitch.
http://www.welcometonightvale.com/

Limetown

Ten years ago, over three hundred men, women and children disappeared from a small town in Tennessee, never to be heard from again. In this podcast, American Public Radio reporter Lia Haddock asks the question once more, “What happened to the people of Limetown?”
https://www.twoupproductions.com/shows/limetown

Non-Fiction Podcasts

Nerdette
A safe space for “nerding out” about all the things you’re watching, reading, listening to and encountering in real life. Hosts Tricia Bobeda and Greta Johnsen talk to people about their obsessions: from science to science fiction, great lady nerds of history to Beyoncé.
http://www.npr.org/podcasts/399954056/nerdette-podcast

Invisibilia
Invisibilia is Latin for “the invisible things.” This podcast explores the invisible forces that shape human behavior — things like ideas,

beliefs, assumptions and emotions.
http://www.npr.org/programs/invisibilia/

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Written by Brigitte Bell for the 2017 Fall Library Newsletter

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New Books Are Waiting for You!

We are in full swing here in the Brown Library, and we have new books waiting for you! Here a just a handful of the new titles available at the NEW ITEMS bookcase for checkout with a valid USF Photo ID.

The Gay Revolution, by Lillian Faderman (306.76 F144)

The sweeping story of the struggle for gay and lesbian rights—based on amazing interviews with politicians, military figures, and members of the entire LGBT community who face these challenges every day: “This is the history of the gay and lesbian movement that we’ve been waiting for” (The Washington Post).

Lillian Faderman is an internationally known scholar of lesbian history and literature, as well as ethnic history and literature. Among her many honors are six Lambda Literary Awards, two American Library Association Awards, and several lifetime achievement awards for scholarship.

The War That Saved My Life, by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley (J NEWBERY HONOR 2016 / 813 B811w)

*2016 Newbery Honor book

Ten-year-old Ada has never left her one-room apartment. Her mother is too humiliated by Ada’s twisted foot to let her outside. So when her little brother Jamie is shipped out of London to escape the war, Ada doesn’t waste a minute—she sneaks out to join him.

So begins a new adventure for Ada, and for Susan Smith, the woman who is forced to take the two kids in. As Ada teaches herself to ride a pony, learns to read, and watches for German spies, she begins to trust Susan—and Susan begins to love Ada and Jamie. But in the end, will their bond be enough to hold them together through wartime? Or will Ada and her brother fall back into the cruel hands of their mother?

The Productivity Project, by Chris Bailey (650.1 B154)

Chris Bailey turned down lucrative job offers to pursue a lifelong dream—to spend a year performing a deep dive experiment into the pursuit of productivity, a subject he had been enamored with since he was a teenager. After obtaining his business degree, he created a blog to chronicle a year-long series of productivity experiments he conducted on himself, where he also continued his research and interviews with some of the world’s foremost experts, from Charles Duhigg to David Allen.

The Productivity Project—and the lessons Chris learned—are the result of that year-long journey. In an eye-opening and thoroughly engaging read, Bailey offers a treasure trove of insights and over 25 best practices that will help you accomplish more.

Wolf Hollow, by Lauren Wolk (J NEWBERY HONOR 2017 / 813 W862)

*2017 Newbery Honor Book

Growing up in the shadows cast by two world wars, Annabelle has lived a mostly quiet, steady life in her small Pennsylvania town. Until the day new student Betty Glengarry walks into her class. Betty quickly reveals herself to be cruel and manipulative, and while her bullying seems isolated at first, things quickly escalate, and reclusive World War I veteran Toby becomes a target of her attacks. While others have always seen Toby’s strangeness, Annabelle knows only kindness. She will soon need to find the courage to stand as a lone voice of justice as tensions mount.

Brilliantly crafted, Wolf Hollow is a haunting tale of America at a crossroads and a time when one girl’s resilience, strength, and compassion help to illuminate the darkest corners of our history.

The Color of Law, by Richard Rothstein (305.800973 R847)

In this groundbreaking history of the modern American metropolis, Richard Rothstein, a leading authority on housing policy, explodes the myth that America’s cities came to be racially divided through de facto segregation―that is, through individual prejudices, income differences, or the actions of private institutions like banks and real estate agencies. Rather, The Color of Law incontrovertibly makes clear that it was de jure segregation―the laws and policy decisions passed by local, state, and federal governments―that actually promoted the discriminatory patterns that continue to this day.

Richard Rothstein is a research associate of the Economic Policy Institute and a Fellow at the Thurgood Marshall Institute of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund. He lives in California, where he is a Fellow of the Haas Institute at the University of California–Berkeley.

 

Happy reading!

 

Summer Reading Top 10!

We’ve put together our Summer Reading Top 10 list for all you readers out there. Let’s get started!

Dragon Teeth by Michael Crichton, POP LIT Cri

The year is 1876. Warring Indian tribes still populate America’s western territories even as lawless gold-rush towns begin to mark the landscape. In much of the country it is still illegal to espouse evolution. Against this backdrop two monomaniacal paleontologists pillage the Wild West, hunting for dinosaur fossils, while surveilling, deceiving and sabotaging each other in a rivalry that will come to be known as the Bone Wars.

A page-turner that draws on both meticulously researched history and an exuberant imagination, Dragon Teeth is based on the rivalry between real-life paleontologists Edwin Drinker Cope and Othniel Charles Marsh; in William Johnson readers will find an inspiring hero only Michael Crichton could have imagined. Perfectly paced and brilliantly plotted, this enormously winning adventure is destined to become another Crichton classic.

Dark Matter by Blake Crouch, POP LIT Cro

A mind-bending, relentlessly paced science-fiction thriller, in which an ordinary man is kidnapped, knocked unconscious–and awakens in a world inexplicably different from the reality he thought he knew.

Same Beach, Next Year by Dorothea Benton Frank

New York Times bestselling author Dorothea Benton Frank returns to her magical Lowcountry of South Carolina in this bewitching story of marriage, love, family, and friendship that is infused with her warm and engaging earthy humor and generous heart.

One enchanted summer, two couples begin a friendship that will last more than 20 years and transform their lives.

Bursting with the intoxicating richness of Dorothea Benton Frank’s beloved Lowcountry — the sultry sunshine, cool ocean breezes, icy cocktails, and starry velvet skies — Same Beach, Next Year is a dazzling celebration of the infrangible power of friendship, the enduring promise of summer, and the indelible bonds of love.

Camino Island by John Grisham

A gang of thieves stage a daring heist from a secure vault deep below Princeton University’s Firestone Library. Their loot is priceless, but Princeton has insured it for 25 million dollars.

Bruce Cable owns a popular bookstore in the sleepy resort town of Santa Rosa on Camino Island in Florida. Very few people know that he occasionally dabbles in the black market of stolen books and manuscripts. Mercer Mann is a young novelist with a severe case of writer’s block. She is approached by an elegant, mysterious woman working for an even more mysterious company. A generous offer of money convinces Mercer to go undercover and infiltrate Bruce Cable’s circle of literary friends. But eventually Mercer learns far too much, and there’s trouble in paradise as only John Grisham can deliver it.

The Nerdy and the Dirty by B.T. Gottfred, POP LIT Got

A cool girl–with an X-rated internal life–and a socially-inept guy prove that opposites attract in this honest look at love, sexuality, and becoming your true self.

Into the Water by Paula Hawkins, POP LIT Haw

The author of the #1 New York Times bestseller and global phenomenon The Girl on the Train returns with Into the Water, her addictive new novel of psychological suspense.

A single mother turns up dead at the bottom of the river that runs through town. Earlier in the summer, a vulnerable teenage girl met the same fate. They are not the first women lost to these dark waters, but their deaths disturb the river and its history, dredging up secrets long submerged.

Beware a calm surface — you never know what lies beneath.

The Secret History of Wonder Woman by Jill Lepore, POP LIT 741.5973 Lep

A cultural history of Wonder Woman traces the character’s creation and enduring popularity, drawing on interviews and archival research to reveal the pivotal role of feminism in shaping her seven-decade story.

Examines the life of Wonder Woman creator William Moulton Marston and his polyamorous relationship with wife Elizabeth Holloway and mistress Olive Byrne, both of whom inspired and influenced the comic book character’s creation and development.

Yes, Please! by Amy Poehler, POP LIT 818.602 Poe

In Amy Poehler’s highly anticipated first book, Yes Please, she offers up a big juicy stew of personal stories, funny bits on sex and love and friendship and parenthood and real life advice (some useful, some not so much), like when to be funny and when to be serious. Powered by Amy’s charming and hilarious, biting yet wise voice, Yes Please is a book full of words to live by.

The Girl Who Knew Too Much by Amanda Quick

When Hollywood moguls and stars want privacy, they head to an idyllic small town on the coast, where the exclusive Burning Cove Hotel caters to their every need. It’s where reporter Irene Glasson finds herself staring down at a beautiful actress at the bottom of a pool…

Seeking the truth, Irene finds herself drawn to a master of deception. Oliver Ward was once a world-famous magician — until he was mysteriously injured during his last performance. With Oliver’s help, Irene soon learns that the glamorous paradise of Burning Cove hides dark and dangerous secrets. And that the past — always just out of sight — could drag them both under…

The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O. by Neal Stephenson and Nicole Galland, POP LIT Ste

Boston, present day. A young man from a shadowy government agency shows up at an Ivy League university and offers an eminent professor a lot of money to study a trove of recently discovered old documents. The only condition: the professor must sign an NDA that would preclude him from publishing his findings, should they be significant. The professor refuses and tells the young man to get lost.

On his way out, he bumps into a young woman–a low-on-the-totem-pole adjunct faculty member who’s more than happy to sign the NDA and earn a few bucks. The documents, if authentic, are earth-shaking: they prove that magic actually existed and was practiced for much of human history. And so the shadowy government agency–the Department of Diachronic Operations, or DODO–gets cracking on its real mission: to develop a device that is shielded from whatever it is that interferes with magic and thus send Diachronic Operatives back in time to meddle with history.